Friday, 19 September 2014

Poetry Corner #15

Paradise Lost is an epic piece of poetry written by John Milton in 1667. It is far too long to post as a whole therefore I have chosen the most famous extract to share today from Book One.

Extract from Paradise Lost (Book 1)

Of Man’s first disobedience, and the fruit      
Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste    
Brought death into the world, and all our woe,          
With loss of Eden, till one greater Man          
Restore us, and regain the blissful seat,                
Sing, Heav'nly Muse, that, on the secret top 
Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire      
That Shepherd who first taught the chosen seed,     
In the beginning how the heav'ns and earth  
Rose out of Chaos; or if Sion hill               
Delight thee more, and Siloa’s brook that flowed      
Fast by the oracle of God, I thence   
Invoke thy aid to my advent'rous song,         
That with no middle flight intends to soar      
Above th' Aonian mount, while it pursues              
Things attempted yet in prose or rhyme

John Milton 1608-1674

Wednesday, 17 September 2014

Wondrous Words Wednesday


Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you have encountered or spotlight words you love.  This weekly meme is hosted by BermudaOnion's Weblog.  If you would like to join then please hop over (see link above) and add your URL to the Linky.

I am currently reading Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy which has thrown me some new and interesting words.

Reticulated - adj. 1. Constructed, arranged or marked like a net or network.
2. (of porcelain) interlacing lines forming a net or web.
3. (architecture) relating to or denoting a style of decorated tracery characterised by circular shapes drawn at top and bottom into ogees, resulting in a net-like framework.

"[...] in a pink pinafore, of a finely reticulated pattern, worn over a shift frock [...]."

Ogee - noun. 1. a molding with an S shaped profile.
2. a pointed arch having on each side a reversed curve near the apex.

Pollarded - verb. To make (a tree) into a pollard.
Pollard - noun. A tree polled so as to produce a close rounded head of young branches.

"[...] where enormous yew-trees, not when planted by the hand of men grew as they had grown when they were pollarded for bows." 

Sylvan (silvan) - adj. of the woods, having woods, rural.

"All this sylvan antiquity, however, though visible from the slopes [...]."

Concatenation - noun. 1. A series of interconnected things.
2. The action of linking things together in a series, or the condition of being linked in such a way.

" The machine had begun, a moving concatenation of three horses and the aforesaid long rickety machine was visible over the gate [..]"

Have you found any words to share?



Sunday, 14 September 2014

Sunday Post #6


The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba @ Caffeinated Book Reviewer.
It’s a chance to share news. A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog. This is your news post, so personalise it! Include as much as you want or as little. Check out the rules of the meme.

Posts on Booketta's Book Blog
Sunday Post #5
My give-away winner was announced: Lainy from SMBSLT

Posts on my other blogs

Useful posts elsewhere in the Blogosphere

Books Read
New Moon - Stephanie Meyer 4*
Burning Bright - Tracy Chevalier 3*

Current Reads
I am working my way through some poetry collections including:
The World's Wife  - Carol Ann Duffy
I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud... - Ana Sampson
More Poetry Please - BBC Books
My current read is:
Tess of the D'Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy

My Musical Listens
Paul Simon - Graceland
Katie Melua - The House
The Kooks - Inside In/Inside Out

On TV
Crimes of Passion
Doctor Who

My Week
I had a fairly ordinary week with my regular Pilates class and usual stuff.  Both the teen and I had our hair done, the usual for me but the teen's was a bit more drastic.  She went for an undercut but has kept the rest of her hair long.  The hairdressers tried to dissuade her but she has been set on this style for some time.  I went on my last walk with the ramblers for a while and this was quite a big walk for me.  Only 8.7 miles but a rather steep climb up Fan Y Big in the Brecon Beacons.  You can see the photos in the link above. 

Next Week
Yoga commences for this term and I can't wait to get back to class.  Book group returns after summer break on a monthly basis and I am looking forward to hearing what the group have to say about our two reads: The Cuckoo's Calling - Robert Galbraith and Alys Always - Harriet Lane.  I am meeting a friend from my former writing class for coffee and a catch up.  I think I have been roped in for some envelope stuffing for the ramblers too

Blog Book Plans
I hope I will have some more words to share on Wondrous Words Wednesday.
A poem for Poetry Corner..
Review?  Watch this space!
My next book choice will be whatever comes out of the book jar.

What are you sharing with us today?

Friday, 12 September 2014

Poetry Corner #14

As you will be aware having seen several TV programs dedicated to the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas, it is the anniversary year celebrating his 100th Birthday.  This week I have decided to post one of his most famous poems Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night.  Dylan Thomas was born October 27th 1914 in Swansea, Wales.  He died on 9th November 1953.  Visit the website Dylan Thomas.com to find out more him.


Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on that sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light. 

Dylan Thomas

Wednesday, 10 September 2014

Wondrous Words Wednesday


Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you have encountered or spotlight words you love.  This weekly meme is hosted by BermudaOnion's Weblog.  If you would like to join then please hop over (see link above) and add your URL to the Linky.

My better half and I do the crossword on most days and on Sunday we came across a couple of words that I did not know.

prolix - adj. (of speech or writing) using or containing too many words, tediously lengthy.

The clue was verbose, wordy.

flitch - n. 1. a slab of timber cut from a tree trunk, usually from the outside.
2. a side of bacon.

The clue was side of bacon.

From The Impressionist - Hari Kunzru

hawker - n. one who hawks goods about.
"Hawkers of tea and sweets."

drubbing - n. 1. a beating; a thrashing.
2. a resounding defeat in a match or contest.
"[...] and there give them a thorough drubbing."

What words have you got to share this week?

Sunday, 7 September 2014

Sunday Post #5


The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba @ Caffeinated Book Reviewer.
It’s a chance to share news. A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog. This is your news post, so personalise it! Include as much as you want or as little. Check out the rules of the meme.


Posts on Booketta's Book Blog
Sunday Post #4

Posts on my other blogs

Useful posts elsewhere in the Blogosphere

Books Read
Trash - Andy Mulligan 4*

Current Reads

I am working my way through some poetry collections including:

The World's Wife  - Carol Ann Duffy
I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud... - Ana Sampson
More Poetry Please - BBC Books
My current read is:
New Moon - Stephanie Meyer

My Musical Listens
Katie Melua - Call Off the Search
Eric Clapton - Crossroads
KT Tunstall - Drastic Fantastic
John Legend - Evolver

On TV
Crimes of Passion


My Week
My regular weekly commitment Pilates class is now back on and I managed a couple of walks both with a friend and with the Ramblers group.  I visited a friend one afternoon, we hadn't met up for a while so that was nice to catch up.  I went for a meal with the better half and his walking pals which was really nice and good value.  I was designated driver so I didn't get to drink but that wasn't a problem for me.  The teen and I didn't get to the writing group as she was feeling tired and a bit run down with a virus.


Next Week
I don't have a lot in the calendar yet other than the regular activities this week.  Fingers crossed the teen and I will get to hear the anthologies being performed. I will get my last big walk with the group this week as my yoga class returns the following week. The teen returns to college and is still awaiting her timetable.  They really do leave it to the eleventh hour!  


Blog Book Plans

I hope I will have some more words to share on Wondrous Words Wednesday.
A poem for Poetry Corner.
I will have a give-away winner by the end of the week.
Review?  Watch this space!
My next book choice will be whatever comes out of the book jar.

What are you sharing with us today?


Friday, 5 September 2014

Poetry Corner #13

I have decided to share a poem by Robert Louis Stevenson, best known for Treasure Island and Kidnapped.   He was born in Scotland (13 November 1850 – 3 December 1894).


The House Beautiful

A naked house, a naked moor,
A shivering pool before the door,
A garden bare of flowers and fruit
And poplars at the garden foot:
Such is the place that I live in,
Bleak without and bare within. 

Yet shall your ragged moor receive
The incomparable pomp of eve,
And the cold glories of the dawn
Behind your shivering trees be drawn;
And when the wind from place to place
Doth the unmoored cloud-galleons chase,
Your garden gloom and gleam again,
With leaping sun, with glancing rain.
Here shall the wizard moon ascend
The heavens, in the crimson end
Of day's declining splendour; here
The army of the stars appear.
The neighbour hollows dry or wet,
Spring shall with tender flowers beset;
And oft the morning muser see
Larks rising from the broomy lea,
And every fairy wheel and thread
Of cobweb dew-bediamonded.
When daisies go, shall winter time
Silver the simple grass with rime;
Autumnal frosts enchant the pool
And make the cart-ruts beautiful;
And when snow-bright the moor expands,
How shall your children clap their hands!
To make this earth our hermitage,
A cheerful and a changeful page,
God's bright and intricate device
Of days and seasons doth suffice.

Robert Louis Stevenson

Thursday, 4 September 2014

Autumn Give-away

At last!  I promised a give-away and I know it is a tad overdue but better late than never. 

 To celebrate a new month September and a new season Autumn I am hosting a PreLoved Give-away.

One paperback copy of The Englishman by Helena Halme


This copy has been read once and is in excellent condition.
Here is my review.

How to enter:
The competition is open to UK residents only.
  (Due to postage costs I can only post within the UK.)
You must be 16 years of age or over.
Complete the form below.
Once the winner is chosen I shall email, message or tweet whichever means the entrant prefers to be notified.
The winning entrant will have three days to respond via email, PM or DM with their details.


a Rafflecopter giveaway

Wednesday, 3 September 2014

Wondrous Words Wednesday


Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you have encountered or spotlight words you love.  This weekly meme is hosted by BermudaOnion's Weblog.  If you would like to join then please hop over (see link above) and add your URL to the Linky.

I have finished Call the Midwife by Jennifer Worth but have another word to share from the book.

internecine - adj. 1. Destructive to both sides in combat.
2. Relating to conflict within a group.
"I have seen internecine fighting between siblings, especially in overcrowded conditions [...]."

Some words I have saved over the weeks.

From To The Fair Land - Lucienne Boyce

toping - vb. To drink intoxicating liquor to excess esp. habitually.
"They let alone any man foolish enough to stay late toping so close to the quay side."

miasma - noun. An infectious or noxious escape of air etc.
"[...] her hood drawn about her to protect herself from the harbourside miasma seeping from dark mud and glistening stone."

From Started Early, Took My Dog - Kate Atkinson

nabob - noun. 1. A Muslim official or governor under the Mogul empire.
2. A person of conspicuous wealth or high status."
"[...] had gone off for a weekend on a yacht with some rich nabob."

Have you any words to share this week?


Tuesday, 2 September 2014

Book Review: Trash - Andy Mulligan

Synopsis - Three friends.  Raphael, Gardo and Rat.  Living on a heap of trash, a lifetime of sifting rubbish.  One day they find something extraordinary - a deadly secret.  From that moment they are hunted without mercy.

With danger snatching at their heels, the boys are chased from the city's dirty gutters to its wealthy avenues.  But they can't run for ever.  They need a miracle.

Review - I won this book from a competition some time ago and I wondered why I had not read it before.  It had got pushed to the back of my shelves.  I am so pleased I made a book jar it is a great way to aid the choosing of what to read next.  I digress.  Onto the review.

If you read the journalists reviews they liken this novel to Slumdog Millionaire.  There are similarities in so far as the central characters are from the poorest quarters and both stories have clues and involve problem solving.

Our three characters live in Behala a very poor area where all the country's trash is dumped.  The only way these young boys can survive is by sifting through the trash for valuable and saleable articles and trying to earn some much needed dough.  When they find a bag their lives change dramatically but not without some adventure.  Using their wits and some contacts they follow the trail of clues to find the answer.  Great fun read.  The audience will root for these boys and gasp when they are within a hair's whisker of danger.

Although this novel falls under the YA genre it did not feel that it particularly spoke to that age group.  I felt it was a work of fiction that could appeal to all.  4*

ISBN 978-1-849-92056-8
Published by David Fickling Books 2011

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